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New school year, new start with TomTag

Looking forward to the children going back to school but dreading those chaotic school mornings?

Help your kids learn to get themselves ready for school, know and understand their own routine and remember what they need to pack – with less nagging from you and a lot less stress all round.

It really is easy with a little help from TomTag!

The tags featured in this video were made using TomTag’s I can do it – self care skills and I can do it – pack my bag for school kits.

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TomTag: your stories – Elizabeth

We learn a great deal from listening to our customers about their experiences with TomTag. It’s always interesting to find out about the different ways they use our products and wonderful to hear how it often makes such a real difference to their lives.

We thought it might be helpful to share some of those experiences and ideas with you too so we’ve interviewed a number of our customers who have been kind enough to talk about their different stories and backgrounds with us.

First up is Elizabeth, a childminder from London, and mum to two girls aged 4 and 12. 

Why did you purchase TomTag?

I bought TomTag to use with my daughters as both girls are on the autistic spectrum. Although they are both verbal and relatively high functioning they still need some support with their daily life activities.

I’d describe my youngest daughter as being in a permanent ‘fight or flight’ mode, always needing reassurance about what to expect during the day. The eldest has executive functioning issues and needs support to help her sequence activities and with organisation.

Did you use any other type of visual supports before you tried TomTag?

I used to make my own picture timetables and sequences. It was very time consuming having to print off the pictures, laminate them and then attach them to Velcro. My youngest daughter really didn’t like the Velcro system so when I saw TomTag advertised in Aukids magazine I decided to give them a try.

So, how do you use it?

In lots of different ways! 

For my younger daughter I have set up:TomTag examples at home Elizabeth

  • daily timetables that I create by prominently displaying 3 tags on hooks on the fridge (and also in the other rooms where she needs to use them) to show her what her morning, afternoon and evening routines should be
  • a toilet routine reminder hanging in the bathroom which is a simple picture sequence checklist to break the routine down into small steps.
  • social story resources to help prepare for things like visits to the doctor and hairdresser. I explain what’s going to happen and the order of events whilst we look at the pictures together.

My elder daughter uses TomTag for: 

Younger child tag examples

How has TomTag helped your children?

My little one finds TomTag very comforting. She feels in control of her day now and is less anxious about what is going to happen next. Seeing her routine in pictures also helps with teaching her sequences and time concepts. She loves the ‘hands on’ system – she particularly enjoys clicking the buttons in and out!

My older daughter finds TomTag really helps with her organisational skills. She feels less anxious at school knowing she has all the right things with her. She also likes the ’hands on’ nature of TomTag and she’s now started taking responsibility for planning and organising her day. For example, when she started going to choir as an after school activity, she changed her tag by herself to show this change of routine.

I’ve also found the tips and advice for teaching life skills on your website very helpful.

Do you have any suggestions for how we could make TomTag even better?

The range of images supplied in the various sticker packs is generally good. I have used the blank stickers to draw some personalised images – an umbrella, keys and phone charger.

I think there could be some additional ‘days out’ type images e.g. summer fair, fun fair, adventure park or castle. Perhaps a jumbo version of the tags and buttons would be useful for children who have sight problems but I appreciate the product would not then be as portable!

Overall I think TomTag is a wonderful product and it has really made life easier for both my daughters.

Thank you Elizabeth for sharing your story and for giving us some insightful tips on how TomTag works in your home.

Follow the highlighted links in the interview to find out more details about all the products used by Elizabeth and her family.

Would you like to share your story with us?

All it takes is a short chat with us on the ‘phone, ideally send us a few pics of your TomTags in use then just leave the rest to us. It’s easy to get in touch with us, all the details are on our Contact Us page. 

 

 

 

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TomTag life skill of the month – getting dressed – August 2015

Learning how to put on their clothes and shoes is an important step for children to take on the road to independence.  The ability to get dressed by themselves will give them confidence to function independently at school and, once your child has it mastered, it’s one less thing for you to worry about in the mornings!

LIFE SKILL getting dressed
dressing checklist 1If your child starts school in September then now would be a great time to start developing their dressing skills, giving a few weeks practice time before the big day.

Getting dressed – putting on clothes in the right order, fastening buttons and zips and tying shoe laces – involves mastering many skills. We need balance and co-ordination of movements to get our limbs in all the right places, refined motor skills to deal with many types of fastenings and an understanding of concepts such as left/right and inside/outside.

Teaching these skills often requires a lot of patience but the results will be worth it in the long run. Using TomTag to make a simple visual checklist showing what order each item of clothing should be put on is a good place to start. You can also help by laying out clothes the night before, making sure they are the right side out.

With practice and encouragement your child will soon be dressed and ready to go before you are!


uniformUniform

With most schools these days having a uniform, there will be little choice in which clothes your child can wear for school. There are some things you can do though to make things a little easier for them.

Only undo the top few buttons on a shirt or blouse and put it on over the head so that fewer buttons need to be done up. Buttonholes on new shirts are often tight so opening them up slightly may help.

Choose trousers or skirts with elasticated waists where possible and opt for loose fitting items with velcro or large buttons which are easier to put on than tight fitting ones.


tieTie

If your child’s uniform includes a tie and an elasticated version isn’t an option, this useful video of a young boy demonstrating how to tie a tie may help.

 

 


socksSocks

Begin with large, short socks that slip more easily over the feet. Socks with coloured heels make it easier to get them the right way round. Try Little Grippers school socks for socks that stay on – and up! – all day long.

 

 


shoesShoes

Having a designated place for shoes will save valuable time spent hunting for them in the morning! Of course, these days there are many alternatives to traditional laced shoes available but at some point the skill to tie laces will be required. The ‘bunny ears’ is a popular method and YouTube is an excellent resource for demonstrations of this and other tying methods.

Try practising using different coloured, longer laces but if your child continually struggles with tying laces then there are now several products on the market (such as Hickies, Greepers and Lock Laces) that can help.


coatCoat

Start practising with different, larger types of coat. If the sleeve by sleeve approach isn’t working try this flip flop over the top method wonderfully described by Connectability.ca – you might want to stand well back until they get better at this one though!

Attach a zip pull (like our funky TomTag ones) or a key ring to the zip to help with gripping the tab and make zipping easier.


starWell done!

Don’t forget to give plenty of praise to your child for their efforts at each stage and consider using a star chart to help them establish their routine.

A great approach to use is ‘backward chaining‘ where the child learns the last step first. Once they can do the last step, teach the second to last step and so on until they have mastered them all. The great advantage of this method is that the child always gets the reward of completing the task themselves.

Sensory and developmental issues

If your child is sensitive to clothing, EcoOutfitters offer school clothing made from 100% pure organic cotton.

Check for labels and seams that might cause irritation and cut them out where possible. Washing clothes several times before wearing helps to soften them too.

Dressing in front of a mirror provides important visual cues that can help a child with sequencing, body planning and body awareness. If your child continues to have difficulty with dressing, a qualified occupational therapist should be able to help.

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TomTag life skill of the month – personal hygiene – July 2015

LIFE SKILL july personal hygieneTeaching children the importance of keeping their bodies clean is the best way to help prevent infections and reduce the spread of germs. Helping children feel good about themselves and caring about the way they look is important for self esteem and helps them to keep healthy in later life.

Parents should lead by example by making personal hygiene part of everyday life. A simple visual checklist breaking down personal hygiene routines into small steps can be an effective way to teach and remind children how to take care of their bodies and will help them develop good personal hygiene practices for life.

personal hygiene collage

Using TomTag

Checklists for learning personal hygiene routines such as hand washing, showering, bathing, hair care or general daily hygiene tasks can be created using symbols from our self care sticker pack. Our In the House sticker pack also contains a selection of personal care symbols.

Keep them handy in the bathroom or bedroom – all our stickers, tags and buttons are waterproof so there’s no need to worry about any splashes!

Here’s some tips for hygiene skills we think are particularly important.


wash handsWash hands

Hand washing is the most effective way to prevent the spread of infection. Remind children to wash their hands after using the toilet, playing outside, before eating, after blowing their nose or coughing and after petting animals.

Show children how to wash hands effectively using the 5 step method – wet, lather, scrub, rinse, dry. Get more tips from the NHS wash your hands campaign.


brush hairBrush hair

Hair should be brushed every day. If your child has sensory issues try a brush with a large head and use a firm stroke as you brush. Use strategies such as brushing in front of a mirror so your child can predict when the brush is coming and giving definite time limits to the task e.g. let’s count to 10.

 


bathShower/bath

Establish a regular bathing routine either daily or every few days. This may be a calming activity as part of your child’s night time routine. Show your child how to wash the entire body and if sensory issues are a consideration, use non perfumed soap, a large sponge and lots of deep pressure when washing and drying.

 


deodorantDeodorant

As your child becomes older body odour may be an issue. Provide deodorant if necessary and explain why it is needed. Emphasise that using a deodorant is not an alternative to washing!

 

 


cut nailsCut nails

Keeping nails short helps to prevent bacteria and dirt from collecting under them. If your child dislikes having their nails cut try using baby nail clippers and cutting them straight after bathing when the nails are softer. Cutting nails whilst they are asleep is another option but only if your child is a sound sleeper!

 


blow noseBlow nose

Remind your child not to pick their nose as this increases the spread of germs. Teaching a child how to blow their nose can be a frustrating task so if you’re struggling this article How to teach kids to blow their nose from Parenting magazine contains some really great tips.


 

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TomTag life skill of the month – oral hygiene – June 2015

LIFE SKILL june oral hygienePoor oral hygiene can be damaging for children in many ways; they may not want to smile, have problems eating food and then there’s the pain and upset of toothache. This can easily be prevented by introducing a regular and healthy teeth-cleaning routine as early as possible.

A simple visual checklist breaking down the teeth-brushing routine into small steps is an effective way to teach children how to take care of their teeth. Setting a good example by following a proper daily hygiene routine yourself as well as regular reminders to your child will pave the way for great dental health and happy smiles!

toothbrush

Toothbrush

Choose a medium soft brush with a small head. Letting your child choose their own toothbrush may encourage them to use it too.

 


toothpaste

Toothpaste

Using a flouride toothpaste helps prevent decay. Check on the pack and use a toothpaste with a flouride level of at least 1000ppm for children up to age three and 1350-1500ppm for anyone older.

 


Toothpaste on brush

Children under three should use a smear of toothpaste and then only use a pea-sized amount to up age seven.

Brush twice a day – once just before bedtime (but after any milk or other snacks) and at least one more time during the day.


brush teeth

Brush teeth

Use small circular motions with gentle pressure and concentrate on one section at a time. Brush for at least 2 minutes – using a timer really helps. We love the free, NHS approved, Brush DJ app that plays 2 minutes of music taken from your device to make brushing more entertaining!
Spit out toothpaste but don’t rinse or only use a small amount of water so as not to wash away the flouride.


floss teeth

Floss teeth

Flossing once a day helps to clean thoroughly between teeth and prevents the build-up of plaque. Floss sticks can make the job easier for children than traditional string floss.

 


awesome

Great job!

Don’t forget to praise your child for their efforts and maybe even use a star chart to get them established in their routine and reward them when they remember to brush without any reminder.

 

Using TomTag

Use symbols from our self care sticker pack to make a list like this one and keep it handy in the bathroom – all our stickers, tags and buttons are waterproof so there’s no need to worry about any splashes!

Other resources

The Children’s University of Manchester have some great interactive online resources about teeth and gums aimed at KS2 children and the British Dental Health Foundation offers plenty of practical advice and information on caring for children’s teeth.

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Teach toothbrushing with TomTag

With startling statistics of widespread tooth decay in children being published this week in the latest Children’s Dental Health Survey, it’s clearly an issue in many households.

brush teeth tag
Having a regular and efficient toothbrushing routine is a step in the right direction for putting your children on the road to good dental health.

Keeping a simple checklist on hand in the bathroom is a great way to get started.

We made this one using images from our Self Care pack. A tag and a pack of stickers = £5.20, far cheaper than a lifetime of fillings and dental treatment!

We also recommend downloading the free, NHS-approved Brush DJ app onto your phone or tablet. This app plays 2 minutes of music taken from the user’s device to encourage brushing for an effective length of time.